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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)
that they have to try to cut spending to deal with the nation's deficit. we're watching what's going on at the white house, we'll have the full coverage of the news conference leading into it. we're also watching right now what's happening in newtown, connecticut. one month to the stay after that brutal massacre, you're looking now at live pictures, a news conference there, they're going to read a poem, let's listen in. >> it is a sad honor to be here today. it's been one month since i lost my son dillon and 25 other teams lost their loved ones. at times it feels like only yesterday and at other times it feels as if many years have passed. i still find myself reaching for dillon's hand to walk through a car parking lot. it's so hard to believe he's gone. at the same time i look at our community and what has been achieved in one month. a vacant school has been lovingly restored with great care and attention to welcome students back into a peaceful and safe environment. many businesses and groups are promoting the love we have in newtown as well as fundraising to help those in most nee
driver of our deficits, we can arrive at a package that gets this thing done. i'm happy to have that conversation. what i will not do is to have that negotiation with a gun at the head of the american people, the threat that unless we get our way, unless you gut medicare or medicaid or you know, otherwise slash things that the american people don't believe should be slashed, that we're going to threaten to wreck the entire economy. that is not how historically this has been done. that's not how we're going to do it this time. what i'm saying to you is there is no simpler solution, no ready, credible solution other than congress either give me the authority to raise the debt ceiling or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling because this is about paying your bills. everybody -- everybody here understands this. i mean, this is not a complicated concept. you don't go out to dinner and eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you're breaking the law. congress should think about it the same way that the ame
to live within our means, how are we going to bring down the debt and the budget deficit, what are we going to do about the trade deficit so we can create an economy again that's growing for the good of all. that's the most important thing i think is -- i think is happening. i think it's just so important that we move to a comprehensive strategy to enable economic development in the united states. that's the most important thing we do for all of us. jeff: if you were asked, would you work in if obama administration? -- in the obama administration? >> i've been very pleased to support the administration, this administration and the previous one because that public private partnership especially for manufacturing in the united states and especially with the trade rules around the world, i've been pleased to be asked and listened to. jeff: i mean a real job? >> i think the best thing i can do and feel really good about it is serving forward. jeff: your work is done. you have done it. >> no, we're just getting started. it is an important part of the united states economy. nearly 15% of ou
and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
to dominate his second. that is the nation's debt and deficit. we already reached the $16 trillion debt limit set by congress. treasury secretary tim geithner says his accounting tricks and maneuvers can only buy us a couple more months the president wants to call on congress to raise the debt ceiling without drama. he says even the threat, note to raise the debt ceiling could cause a down-tick in the nation's credit rating as it did in 2011. republicans are determined to use that leverage. it may be the only leverage they have to raise the nation's debt ceiling. in the past it has worked to demand spending cuts in exchange for raising the nation's debt ceiling. they intend to do it this time. heather? heather: a lot going on in washington. we hear rumors the president may address the issue of immigration reform. that may be one of the top priorities of his administration. is he expected to talk about that? >> reporter: perhaps but even before that the president is likely to be asked about efforts to curb the nation's gun violence with vice president biden set to give recommendations to the p
spending, which is the main driver of our deficits, we can arrive at a package that gets this thing done. i'm happy to have that conversation. what i will not do is to have that negotiation with a gun at the head of the american people. the threat that unless we get our way, unless you gut medicare or medicaid, or, you know, otherwise slash things that the american people don't believe should be slashed, that we're going to threaten to wreck the entire economy. that is not how, historically, this has been done. that's not how we're going to do it this time. [ inaudible question ] chuck, what i'm saying to you is that there is no simpler solution, no ready, credible solution other than congress either give me the authority to raise the debt ceiling or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling. because this is about paying your bills. everybody here understands this. i mean, this is not a complicated concept. you don't go out to dinner and then, you know, eat all you want, and then leave without paying the check. and if you do, you're breaking t
before, and have bid have a conversation on how we reduce our deficits further in a sensible way. -- i would have a conversation about how to reduce our deficits in a sensible way. we can talk about how we can make sure we finance our workers getting properly trained and are schools getting the education they deserve. there is a whole growth agenda that is important does well. -- as well. what you have not seen as the notion that has been presented so far by the republicans that deficit reduction will only cover spending cuts, that we will raise the debt ceiling dollar for dollar on spending cuts. there are a whole set of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sens
class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stalize our debt and our deficit and n. a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research, all the things that help us grow. step by step we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years i've signed into law $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that will save an interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 million already saved from winding dow
class is shrinking deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decades. which would stabilize our debt and deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy but it would make it manageable so that it does not crowd out the investments we need to make in people, education, job training, science, medical research. step by step, we made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i have signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that will save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so, we have made progr
for the middle class is shrinking our deficit and a balanced and responsible way. for nearly two years now i have been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce the opposite by four trillion dollars over the next decade, which would stabilize the debt and deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of the economy, but make it manageable so it does not crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training in science and medical research, all the things that help us grow. step-by-step we have made progress towards that goal. over the past two years i have signed into law 1.4 trillion dollars in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans began to pay their fair share. when you add the money we will save an interest payments on debts, altogether that adds up to a total of 2.5 trillion dollars in deficit reduction over the past three years. not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down and get
back on the table. congresswoman january schawowsky and the deficit reduction act. the bill would offer the choice of the publically run health insurance plan. and get this, it would save a hundred billion dollars over the next ten years. this bill is a win for everybody. it will reduce the deficit. obama care has brought the number of uninsured americans to the lowest level since 2008. however, the law would be fully implemented until 2014. it would put pressure on all insurers to lower their premiums in order to compete. it would also provide immediate relief to small businesses and the federal government and all parts of the economy. for example, former defense secretary robert gates has warned the rising -- he has warned of rising military costs for years. >> sharply rising health care costs are consuming an ever-larger share of this department. growing from 19 billion 234 in . >> military health care costs have gone up 300% in the past decade. 2012 was the first year since 1995 military personnel saw an increase in health care premiums. now, there are two things republicans love. t
it back. >>> time 7:17. some fall lists -- 7:10. some analysts say california's budget deficit could possibly be solved by getting oil out of shale in monterey. the monterey shale runs from los angeles to san francisco and macon obtain more than 400 billion barrels of oil. but getting it out, that's tricky. because of the san andre causes fault, the shale rock is not flat so drilling for oil is difficult. however, the u.s. energy information estimates more than $15 -- more than 15 billion barrels of oil can be recovered using new technology. >>> 7:11. how to move forward. the big debate taking place in newtown, connecticut, one month after the tragic school shooting. >> also, what will lance armstrong say? new details about his big interview with oprah just hours away. >>> it's cold out there. lots of upper 20s, 30s. doesn't matter. some of the wind chills in the teens. it will be sine but it is a little -- sunny but it is a little breezy. >>> one month after the newtown, connecticut shooting people there are now talking about what should be done with the building to sandy hook eleme
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make people and education and jobs and science research. step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that will save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made pro
you the deficit. but the actual debt payment, are less than 90 cents on the dollar that we take in. so even if the president as he should should pays our debts, that leaves him with 90 cents on every dollar that comes in to fund the other priorities of government and he wants to threaten not to pay that debt service. i think that's irresponsible of the president to be suggesting default on the debt. we ought to be talking about a bipartisan solution to the spending problem that got us here in the first place. >> i have heard talk in the republican conference about a one or two or three month extension on the debt ceiling. and on a continuing resolution for the budget to run the government. is that one to three month solution not still on the table? >> well, larry, we're proposing a number of different solution, both short term and long term. frankly, president obama needs to start rolling up his sleeves and focusing on both instead of sitting over in the white house and kind of throwing out all the threats to everybody across the country and running around campaigning as if he's still
, spencer michels asks california governor jerry brown if his fiscal turnaround-- from a $27 billion deficit to a balanced budget-- offers a lesson for the nation. . >> you have to make tough choices. you have to live within your means. that means you have to not do everything you want to but you also have to raise more money. >> woodruff: and ray suarez examines a surge in suicides by u.s. troops last year, far exceeding the number killed in combat in afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of landscapes and river you see differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasur. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> a with thengog suport these instituti
component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training, science medical research, all the things that help us grow. now, step by step we've made progress toward that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed in a law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, altogether that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduc
set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and septemberer all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do some
our deficit and a balanced and responsible way. for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficit by four trillion dollars over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit and sustain us for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt and the size of our economy and make it manageable. education and job training in science and research and all of those things that help us grow. step-by-step, we have made progress towards that goal. over the past few years and signed into law 1.4 trillion dollars in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed into law more than $600 billion in revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans began to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we will save in interest payments on the dead altogether that adds up to a total of about 2.5 trillion dollars and deficit reduction over the past two years. not counting the $400 billion already safe from winding down the wars and i rock and afghanistan. we have made progress. we are moving towards our ulti
proclaimed his state's huge budget deficit had disappeared. but some politicians in the golden state are skeptical. newshour correspondent spencer michels sat down with brown in san francisco. his report is a co-production with our colleagues at kqed-san francisco, and begins with some background on the fiscal troubles and the budget fix. >> reporter: california's sorry financial state and cuts made to health and welfare programs have prompted nearly nonstop demonstrations at the state capital in recent times. those protests got going four years ago when california and its then governor republican arnold schwarzenegger faced a staggering budget deficit of $42 billion. the recession, built-in spending, a large population in need of state services like health and welfare, a limit on property taxes, plus republican legislators' refusal to raise taxes created a dilemma in the world's ninth largest economy. with budget cuts coming like clock work, the state's college and university systems declined in offerings and in reputation. schools suffered cutbacks in personnel and programs. servic
that deal with the deficit and also have a vision and the stability in what is going to happen in terms of the voting of economic growth. estimate what the peak to the cut a piece of that. the spending on health not necessarily the biggest cost of the deficit right now but if you look at 20 years, for 30 years it is the alligator that is going to swallow everything. i was on a panel last week and there was a lively argument around should we raise the age for medicare, should we try to change the system and have a fee for service, has the obama administration done a lot to lower the cost of health care going forward so we don't need to do much more? what do you think is in practical terms what needs to be done on health care if you poll people they say we all want to cut medicare celerity want to go dealing with that piece of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a
s. >> while i'm willing to find middle ground to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate. not paying its bills is irresponsible. it's absurd. republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect or ransom in exchange for not crashing the america economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being res
in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab
to see him as the paragon of responsible spending. >> we'll start with the deficit, shrinking more rapidly than at any time since the end of the korean war. in the end of december, we had a deficit for the month of $260 million, not $260 billion, $260 million. which in washington is almost the budget. that's the smallest monthly deficit in five years. some of that is artificial. people pulling transactions forward because they were afraid of higher tax rates in 2013. but for the first three months of 2013, we have a rapidly shrinking fiscal 2013, we have a rapidly shrinking deficit. so we are in a way chasing a vanishing problem. >> which is interesting, and that would allow for some things that are dirty and things that are not so dirty, would completely perhaps get rid of this problem after a while. do you think we're headed for a full stalemate? >> it's such a shame. i think david is right because we have low debt service right now. we're paying less interest on our debt than we had in the reagan and bush administrations before because interest rates are so low. >> but they're g
, particularly when you're in a deficit, the treasury of the united states would have to go out and issue bonds in order to get cash to pay for it. and that was just a cumber some, awkward thing to do. what they did was create this debt cerealing which meant t ce could issue bonds for chunks of money not related to every single law that was passed. it was just because it was cumbersome. it is not a debt control or spending control measure. the president used an analogy today, used many, to say this is like eating at a restaurant, having your fill and not paying the bill. if you want to discuss -- >> dine and dash. >> yes, dine and dash. we have two problems. one is we have to understand the terms of this thing. this is about increasing the treasury's ability to pay for things that have already been committed to by the government. the danger is if you have this discussion about not paying it, those who lend you money seem to think you're not serious about this. imagine having this conversation with american express on the line. we weren't supposed to eat out that much last month. we're only goin
about the deficit implication. allegedly these guys are saying they want to try to help our debt situation. the debt held by the public is about $10 trillion. that makes the math kind of easy. if we lurch from crisis like this every couple of months, at some point our creditors, the folks who lend ution money, are going to insist on an interest rate premium. suppose it goes up 0.1%, ten basis points. that is equivalent to $10 billion more of debt obligations, and the last time we even bellied up to this debt ceiling debate according to the bipartisan policy center, it cost us about $19 billion over ten years because of the very interest rate affect i'm defining. this is a manufactured crisis mentality with the goal of disparaging government and slashing the heck out of social insurance and spending. make no mistakes about it. >> to jared's point, it does nothing to the deficit. >> it makes it worse. >> it makes it worse. >> paul ryan has never been interested in deficit reduction. if you look at the ryan -- >> hang on a second. i just listened to him as the vice presidential cand
, such as the stubbornly high unemployment, a budget deficit he promised to cut in half by the end of the first term. it is a joyous day for the president but reality will kick in. real fast. chris? >> chris: ed henry reporting from the white house, ed, thanks for that. joining me now is a member of the president's inner circle. senior advisor david plouffe. and, david, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> thanks for having me, chris. >> chris: before we get to the inauguration and the president's second term i want to ask you about this terrorist attack in algeria. what is your latest information on how many americans were taken hostage, what is the status of those americans, and, what does the president think of the way the algerian military handled the situation? >> we have no additional information to report and the state department will do that. this is a reminder countries around the world share a joint threat from the terrorist organization, why we're so active about providing expertise and information and technology, to help them destroy these networks where they exist. and, a reminder, obvio
in that time to clear the way for negotiations on long-term deficit reduction, to add muscle to the efforts to bring democrats to the table, they would include a provision in the debt ceiling legislation saying that lawmakers will not be paid if they do not pass a budget blueprint. was it right to step back from challenging the president over raising the debt ceiling? >> well, i think the house proposal is a step in the right direction. no doubt the senate hasn't done it's job. it's been nearly four years since it's passed a budget. but it doesn't go nearly far enough. we have a crisis. i just got back last week from afghanistan. and i had multiple servicemen and women clasp me on the arm and say, please do something about the debt and deficit. we're bankrupting the country. that's what the american people are looking for. and to date, politicians have both parties have been unwilling to take even a tiny step in the right direction. we've got to fix the problem. >> the senate has to pass a budget. do you believe that? >> i do. >> why has it been four years since you've done that? >> well, l
billion deficit to a balanced budget-- offers a lesson for the nation. . >> you have to make tough choices. you have to live within your means. that means you have to not do everything you want to but you also have to raise more
, and the president is saying things like not to worry about the deficit. that is really for the proletarian, the more pedestrian takers among master of the deficit, the sustainable that. this is abject non says that he is doing, and he is being hailed by the national liberal media as some sort of -- some sort of articulation. >> i am one of those who is in the center, a supporter of the bowls' simpson planned and i agree with your characterization the problem is, you are offering a countervailing you. the republicans, with all due respect, are not. there is not an alternative narrative, not pushing the president to negotiate, and he is not talking to anybody. lou: i love this comment. the president saying of the second amendment is not whether we believe in the second member not. you have to literally hear this to believe it. but. >> the issue here is not whether or not we believe in the second amendment. the issue is, are there sensible steps that we can take to make sure that somebody like the individual in newtown cannot walk into a school and gun down a bunch of children. i am confident there are
on the table. >> ironically would probably increase our deficit. it is absurd. >> the president won't back down on the debt ceiling or on gun safety. >> the pressing issue of gun reform. >> exactly one month after the tragedy at sandy hook. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child we should take that step. >> gun violence continues to wreak its deadly toll each day. >> this is a moment to act. >> congress is incapable of passing an assault weapon ban. >> everybody is totally upset by it. >> what makes sense? what works? >> this is a moment to act. >> this is a promise to turn the conversation into actions. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child, we should take that step. >> the lecturer in chief returns to the east room of the white house today to explain something to congressional republicans that previous presidents have not had to explain to congress. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay fo
relief insurance fund. okay? we know that that has been operating at a deficit. it's still in the red right now. this is going to prolong the agony. if we don't fix the core spending problem, we are not going to have money for another disaster. >> neil: i suspect they won't. they have taken some of the fat out. but i am talking in terms of million, not billions. >> million, not billions. >> neil: by the end of tonight, they will have gotten the sandy package out. you fear it's a continuing precedent for spending bad money after good. >> it's the nature of the device they are using to do t. emergency spending and including in emergency spending line-item spending -- want the way it's supposed to be done. we know the government takes in "x" number of dollars and it's lg willing to borrow "x" number of dollars, for the ceiling. for every $6 of $steb, it's borrowed money! we are spending less than we are taking in in revenue. at this point, that comes home to haunt you. i am saying the victims didn't nide the money, we don't need to spend $16 billion on things that don't have to do with v
in the economy. they worry about interest rates going up and they worry about the impact on our deficit. because when interest rates go up, that means the deficit will go up. so we make the problem worse by taking this route if we go down this pathway. >> i want to throw three terms at you that we've had to stomach out in america. debate over the fiscal cliff, the debate over the debt ceiling and the budget show dunn. all three of these very serious. but which is the most serious. >> the debt ceiling could do damage to our countries for decades to come if we hit it and don't expect the problem. this is the most dangerous thing. this is almost a nuclear option. this is really playing with very dangerous things. and one little mistake could be devastating to our country. >> and yet you still come on day after day and smile with me. thank you. always good to see you. >>> by the way, i just want to remind you if you're doing the math, the treasury says it might come up short in its payments as soon as february 15th. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it wort
to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. talk didn't come here to about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)